Using Cloth Nappies at Nursery: A Beginner’s Guide

We started to look for childcare for Tom before he was even born. Competition for the best nurseries can be fierce in London and we knew I’d be going back to work when he was 6 months old, giving us slightly less time to find something than we might otherwise have had. Luckily, we loved the first nursery we saw (don’t worry though: we did visit others for comparison). Now 16 months old, Tom has been happy there for over 10 months and we still love it too.

It’s important to ask questions when visiting nurseries, but one of ours was a slightly unusual one – ‘how do you feel about a baby in cloth nappies?’ We knew we wanted to try using them, so it was important to us to find a childcare setting that would be comfortable with the idea.

As it turned out, the nursery we ended up choosing had never had a baby in cloth before. They said they had people ask before the baby was born, but none of them actually ended up using them. So we presented them with a bit of a learning curve!

10 months on, we (and they) are so experienced with the nappies that no one even thinks twice anymore. We are all just in a routine with them. So for other parents wondering about how to keep using reusables when their baby starts nursery (or other childcare), here is my beginner’s guide to making it work.

Step one: Choosing childcare
Let’s face it, when you are choosing childcare, their attitude to cloth nappies is probably not top priority. Nor should it be. Whether you and your child are comfortable with the setting is the key to making sure that you are both relaxed and happy, so I wouldn’t turn down an otherwise brilliant option just because they aren’t sure about using cloth nappies. However, I would be wary of a nursery or childminder who gives a point-blank “no” on this issue. That kind of lack of flexibility does not bode well for future discussions. And there will be some. What you want from a childcare setting is support in your parenting choices, plus gentle steering on some issues, if you ask for it. A flat no on any issue is not a good start to building that supportive relationship. If they aren’t willing to even consider it, I’d be looking at other options to see if I could find someone who would. My nursery have had to deal with other unusual choices from us, including baby led weaning and turning up with bottles of pumped breast milk, so knowing from the start that they were willing to discuss things with me was important.

If the nursery are willing to give it a go, that is great! If they seem reluctant, but are open to trying, then make it clear you are willing to compromise. That is the situation we found ourselves in with our nursery. The staff were dubious at first, but I made it clear that it was not an all-or-nothing thing. We agreed that I would bring some nappies with me during the settling-in period, so they could see how they worked. If it was too difficult for them to manage, I said we would be open to switching to disposables instead. That way they didn’t have the nappies forced on them and were more open to a trial.

Step two: Starting out
If the setting you choose have used reusable nappies in the past, then you are probably away clear, though they may need a quick demo of the particular brands you use. If, like our nursery, they have never used cloth nappies before, then you are going to need to support them a bit more. Take some nappies in during the settling-in period and demonstrate how they work. If you are using washable wipes too then take those as well so they don’t get a shock later. When your baby starts to go for full days, write a short instruction list and pop it in the change bag. Our nursery have put ours up on the wall by the change mat so that everyone has an easy reference. Expect some hiccups at the start – I used to pack a single disposable as an emergency back-up whilst the staff got used to the system.

A note on nappy styles – for preference, I like the two-part systems which have a separate inner and a waterproof wrap. They are a bit more bomb-proof. However, they are more complicated to use. To make things simple for nursery staff, we use pocket birth-to-potty nappies when Tom goes to nursery. They are much closer to a disposable in use, so were easier for the staff to get comfortable with.

Step three: Packing your change bag
This is a dilemma that parents who use disposables don’t have to face. They just drop a pack of disposables off every couple of weeks. But a cloth nappy user has to pack fresh every day. So how many nappies do you pack? What do you do with the dirties?

The answer is to find out how many times the nursery does nappy changes – most do it on a schedule. Ours does three throughout the day. So I pack three nappies for those changes. I add one spare in case of extra poo, and another spare for emergencies. So that is five in total. I sometimes find they use four, but never all five. The nappies go in fully assembled, with a fleece liner positioned ready on top. I add 10 wipes, pre-soaked, in a waterproof bag (we use one from Cheeky Wipes, but a simple zip-lock would probably do the job). I’d only expect around 6 of those to be used. I also pack a change of clothes, and a waterproof zippered bag for the dirties. It holds three easily and four at a push. I usually put a little bit of cotton wool soaked in tea tree oil in the bottom to help mask smells. Pack the bag the night before, or you are guaranteed to forget something in the morning rush!

A note on change bags: go big. Those cute little roll up kits you sometimes see parents using? Those little backpacks your toddler can carry? Neither of those are going to be able to fit all the kit you need when you use reusables. Ideally, choose something with compartments so that clean clothes, wipes and nappies can be easily located. I can’t recommend any, I’m afraid, as ours came off E-bay and I have no idea what brand it is.

Step four: The big wash
I going to assume that if you are dedicated to using cloth nappies, you will already have gotten in to a washing routine by the time your little one starts going to childcare. We wash every two days. However, going up to four days of work, combined with the winter weather, has meant I have had to add in an extra wash to make sure we have enough nappies clean each day. If you think about it, packing the change bag the night before means you need to have 7 clean nappies ready when you get home in the evening. 5 to go in the change bag, 1 on your baby’s bum to sleep in, and 1 to put on in the morning. Depending on your drying arrangements (we don’t have a tumble drier), that means having at least 14 nappies. More if, like us, you have to rely on radiator heat or sunlight. So factor that in when deciding how often to wash and how many nappies to buy.

I’ll be honest, the washing is the worst part of using cloth nappies whilst working. After a long day, the last thing I want to do is sort through dirty nappies, find the one or two which contain poo, and put that poo down the toilet. Especially as it is likely to be pretty caked on to the fleece liner once it has been stuffed into a change bag all day. If you just can’t face that, disposable liners are definitely the way to go. Even then, you are likely to have to run a wash in the evening, which means getting your tired body off the sofa to hang them up to dry (or sort them if you have a tumbler drier). You could, I suppose, use a laundry service instead, but beware that this may negate much of the eco-credit of using cloth in the first place. As will too much reliance on the tumble drier, for that matter.

The other way round this is to have a large stash of nappies (though see above about eco-friendliness). We’ve compromised by having a back-up stash to our core ones. The core stash, of 14 nappies, is what we use regularly and I aim to keep up with the laundry so we don’t have to go beyond this. Sometimes though, especially if I’ve been away overnight with work, this just doesn’t happen. So we have a second stash of 5 that we bought second-hand. They are a little bit less reliable on leaks as they were heavily used before we got them, but do the job pretty well. We’ve never had a poo explosion anyway! We also have a couple of disposables hanging around from our last weekend away, but I’d expect them still to be there when we next go away, short of the washing machine breaking down.

A note on second-hand nappies: I guess some people might find this gross, though I can’t say it bothers me. Just launder any you get before use to make sure they are clean. I’ve found the best place to buy them is Pre-Loved, rather than auction sites like E-Bay. E-Bay bidding on cloth nappies is ferocious and I have very rarely managed to win one. Prices also often exceed my self-imposed limit of half the price of the item new (including postage). Pre-Loved is gentler and tend to attract people who just want to get rid of their stash quickly, rather than for the best price. I paid 15 quid for 5 on there and trust me that is a bargain. Freecycle is worth a try as well, but I’ve never actually seen any on there – most people who use cloth are assuming they will get some of the initial outlay back by selling them online when they are done. As I plan to. After baby no 2 has had a go with them of course (no not pregnant).

It may seem daunting at first, but using cloth nappies whilst your child is at nursery is actually very doable, for both you and them. Our nursery have even found it makes them more attractive to other parents – they grabbed me the other day to show a prospective mum with a baby in reusables the bag we use for dirties, proving they already know how to use them.

Plus who can resist a squishy cloth bum?

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Natural Remedies for Nappy Rash

I posted recently about the nappy rash Tom developed due to being left too long in a dirty nappy at nursery. Whilst the easiest thing to do for nappy rash is to give babies plenty of nappy free time, this was so bad that I did want to help the healing along a little.

I prefer, where possible, to reach for homemade natural remedies over shop-bought ones. They do have to work, of course – I am not about to leave my child in pain just because I’ve decided that I am vaguely uneasy about using sudocrem (or whatever).

Fortunately, there are some quite effective natural remedies for nappy rash. And best of all, they are things that many households have lying around anyway. Because Tom very rarely gets nappy rash, we are more likely to have these options to hand than nappy cream. Here are a few things that we have found especially effective:

Bicarb of soda (also known as baking soda)

I’ve heard that some people use this as a paste at every nappy change, but we have other things we use at changes. Instead, we put 2 teaspoons of bicarb into Tom’s evening bath. Because it is an alkali, it neutralises any acid from the wee or poo (if, for example, the baby has been eating lots of fruit). It also discourages yeast and bacteria, which helps to combat infections underlying the rash.

Tea Tree Oil

Tea tree oil is a naturally anti-bacterial and anti-fungal. We use it to neutralise odours from the nappy bin, so always have some in the house. For nappy rash, we mix one drop with a tablespoon of sunflower oil and rub it (gently) into the skin under the nappy area. As well as fighting off any bacteria or yeast, the oil helps to prevent moisture from the urine reaching the skin, in much the same way a barrier cream does. You could use coconut oil instead of the sunflower oil. It is another anti-fungal, anti-bacterial ingredient and very good for moisturising dry skin.

Chamomile & Honey Tea with Lavender Oil

This is something we use all the time, not just for nappy rash. We use washable wipes on Tom, rather than wet wipes. About once a week, I make up a solution of chamomile and honey tea, sunflower oil, and a couple of drops of lavender oil. This goes in a spray bottle and is sprayed on the nappy area every nappy change. Lavender has anti-inflammatory properties and is sometimes used to treat burns, so is perfect for nappy rash. Honey is anti-bacterial, and chamomile is soothing. When Tom was little, his tummy button got a little bit infected after the umbilical cord stump fell off. Whilst we were waiting for a doctor’s appointment, I used this mix to wash the area and the infection cleaned up in under 24 hours – no need to go to our GP after all.

These are the remedies we’ve used ourselves at home. With these, Tom’s recent rash was significantly improved after 24 hours and gone within 72 hours. I’ve also seen Oatmeal baths recommended but we haven’t tried them ourselves yet.

Nappy Free Time

I am a bit cross. I picked up Tom from nursery last week to find that he had a serious nappy rash. I’m not talking a bit of redness here, but actual open sores. The staff apologised profusely – apparently he had done a poo, but no one had smelt it for some time. As true nappy rash is caused by the bacteria in the poo reacting with stale wee on the skin to produce ammonia, he had a very sore bum indeed.

They had creamed him up and let him wander around nappy free. Which they were very nervous about telling me. I guess in case I had a problem with my kid being semi-naked in front of a bunch of adults he isn’t related to (it honestly didn’t even occur to me at first – I trust them to change his nappy after all, so this didn’t seem so very different).

The thing is, as I explained to the staff, Tom actually goes nappy free quite a lot at home. We aren’t quite in the elimination communication zone (where babies wear no nappies at all and parents learn when they are about to wee or poo and take them to a potty), but we tend to let him go nappy free in the morning, up until his first nap, then in the evening after dinner until bedtime.

We started doing it when he was tiny, because we noticed he was much happier in the evenings without a nappy on. He was also more mobile – without the bulk of a nappy or clothes he could scoot around the floor on his back many, many months before he started to roll or crawl.

Obviously there is some risk now that he is fully mobile. As a little baby, we just put him down on a pile of towels to catch any accidents. Now, there is no way to keep him on a towel even if we tried. Fortunately, the floors in our flat are mostly hard floor (except the bedrooms) so easy to clean. Wee is not a problem at all, and we have learnt the signs of imminent poo. We can normally catch him before he goes and maneuver a nappy liner under him.

Until now, Tom has not really had any proper nappy rash. Just the occasional bit of redness, normally after a long car journey. I am sure that part of that is down to allowing him to go nappy free so much.

We are treating the current rash with bicarb of soda in his bath, tea tree oil mixed with sunflower oil, and plenty of nappy off time. It’s already looking much, much better.

Anyone else let their little ones wander round with no nappy on? Or do you think we are crazy to risk it?